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Thursday, April 24, 2014

Bookshelf ABC - U

The U.S. Constitution: A Reader is the most important book a United States citizen can read. Too few of us understand the constitution, a living, breathing document composed by visionaries. For everything that is wrong with our country, this is the one thing that is right. This book provides a tutorial on this landmark document.


It would be unconstitutional for you to leave without donating a U title to the cause. Put it in the comments, please.

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Bookshelf ABC - T

Tuck Your Skirt in Your Panties and Run will walk you through some of life's most embarrassing moments and out to the other side. All things will pass if one has a sense of humor in hand. True stories about tough situations and the people who survived them.





Tickle me with T title you have read or would like to read.

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Bookshelf ABC - S

Still Life with Woodpecker remains one of my favorite books of fiction. In college I went through a Tom Robbins phase and his offbeat yet sophisticated humor and characters entertained me in a way that others writers could not. As an author, Robbins influenced my writing as much as Faulkner and Twain. I need to go back and reread Robbins's tomes to see if if I've outgrown them or if I interpret them the same over twenty years since I first discovered them.

Oh, and did I mention that this novel takes place inside a package of Camel cigarettes?


So, do share an S title with me.

Monday, April 21, 2014

Bookshelf ABC - R

Running with Scissors by Augusten Burroughs has been mentioned in my blog before: here http://lucybgoosey.blogspot.com/2011/03/downside-of-perfect-parenting.html and here http://lucybgoosey.blogspot.com/2008/01/christmas-update.html. I love the way this book starts out, with the description of Augustine as a young boy enraptures by the smell of tobacco in his mother's purse. I'm a smell person. Odors trigger childhood memories for me.

Beyond that, the author tends to go for shock and awe over intrigue and drama. He gives graphic details that would be better left to the imagination. Nonetheless, this is a fascinating memoir of a boy caught up in the pathological crazy of multiple adults. Though our Mamas taught us that the polite thing to do would be to look away, we can help but stare at the mess.


Are you ready with your R contribution? Leave it in the comments, please.

Saturday, April 19, 2014

Bookshelf ABC - Q


Q & A a Day: A five year journey is a book you write yourself. My mother gave me mine as a Christmas gift in 2012. I began logging entries on January 1, 2013. Every page has writing prompt and enough space to write about 200 characters, depending on the size of your lettering. Sometimes I answer the questions, often I ignore them and write down what was significant about the day. Now that I'm in my second year, I like looking back at what I wrote in 2013.

A lot happens in a day. This book provides a quick and easy way to keep track of five years of days. The limited space keeps me from self-indulgent rambling and forces me to pin down what was most important about my day.

 
What Q titles have you read or written?


Friday, April 18, 2014

Bookshelf ABC - P

The Pearl was on my school's reading list when I was in 7th, 8th and 9th grades. We were assigned by our English teacher to choose a book to read independently and write a book report. In those idealistic days of youth, I chose to read The Pearl because it was short. Very short. I could knock out 96 pages, write the report and get on with adolescent dawdling.

I was such a stupid kid. John Steinbeck plunges the reader to the depths of the ocean and the human soul. By the time I finished the book, I could taste the salt of sea and tears. That was an inspired book report I turned in!


Please me by leaving a P title that wowed you.

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Bookshelf ABC - O

On Writing by Stephen King is one of the best books he's written in his wildly successful career. He proves that persistent plugging away at a passion pays off, and he shares his wisdom with other writers and the world. You don't need to be a writer to read this book. You don't need to love King's genre to read this book. All you need is curiosity about what goes through the mind of a man who writes novels like Carrie and Amityville Horror and Cujo.

As an added bonus, King includes a list of his favorite books, and they're not all macabre tales of fear and foreboding.


Offer me a suggestion for an O book.

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